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Interview

Your Name Bradley Evans
Interviewee’s First Name Dwain Evans
Interviewee’s Qualifications Executive Officer over Enterprise Accounts in the Southeastern States
Qualifications Bachelors’s degree in Business Admisintration from Georgia College and State University
Qualifications 28 years working for UPS

 

# Interview Question
1 What was it like getting and education in the 20th century?
2 Have you encountered the incorporation of BYOD in the workplace?
3 Do you want to see BYOD incorporated in school systems or do you think the school system is better without it?
4 Which do you think is more effective and why?
5 Would you have liked to have BYOD in school?
6 Why do you think the older people are resistant to incorporating BYOD?
7 How did you adjust to BYOD in the corporate world?
8 Did you want to continue with regular paperwork or did you find BYOD more convenient?

 

As you all know I have been doing my Genius Hour Project on BYOD in the school systems. For my interview, I struggled to decide if I wanted someone extremely knowledgeable about the subject, or if I wanted someone close to the purpose for my research. A happy medium for me would have been someone who knows a little bit about both, which is how I came to the final conclusion that the person I interview should be my father. He is close to my sister and understands her, while at the same time is not oblivious to the fact that the world is changing.

I first explained the concept of what I was doing to my father, and before I could begin the interview, he was so impressed with the Genius Hour concept that we had to spend the first 10 minutes discussing that and how he could incorporate that into his career. I then began to ask him about questions about BYOD, which was a good balance since he grew up in a age where chalk boards was the only thing that they had as educational “tools” so to speak. My father is a very structured person. He would much rather things be consistent and repetitive rather than constant changing and unpredictability. That’s how he was raised and that’s all that he knows. He’s been working with the same company for 26 years, so him being consistent is sort of a understatement.

When it comes to his feelings towards BYOD and as it pertains to my sister Brooke, he admitted that it took awhile. He started off by telling me that he didn’t understand. If he could do it and find the drive, determination, and motivation necessary as a first generation college student, then why couldn’t his daughter.

He couldn’t wrap his head around the fact that this is a new generation with new methods, new definitions of fun, and new and “improved” ways of learning. He knew that Brooke was very tech savvy and that a majority of her time was spent using technology. Once he realized this, I then lead him to understanding that if this is where most of her time is spent anyways, then incorporating education into her favorite past time would be genius. She would be learning and not even feel like it’s hard work because she would be enjoying herself. While reluctant at first, by the end of the interview and now that he had a better understanding, he was a supporter of BYOD in the school systems.

The End

 

Deciding to do my Genius Hour Project on BYOD in the school systems was probably one of the best things I could have ever done. Too often we do things because we’re told to, but for once we were able to do something because of our passion. I feel like Genius Hour is a great method for engaging learning. This allowed for learning that I actually enjoyed. Being that this topic was one that affects me personally, I was more motivated and determined to produce quality work.

While conducting my research on BYOD in school systems, I learned so much that can contribute and help expedite the process of BYOD implementation in schools. BYOD contributes to authentic learning, allows for critical thinking and problem solving with real world situations. As I mentioned in my previous post, BYOD has many pros that outweigh the cons. It saves schools money, allows for assistance for those actually in need, helps student keep their work organized, keeps the students engaged, and since it’s their personal technology, the education can continue even once they get home. I also learned that sometimes it’s not the fact that BYOD is bad that slows this process, but that the older generation is more reluctant to change and advances with modern technology in education.

Although much has been discovered, our work is never done. Research must go on. We must discover if there is any more that technology can give to us educationally. We have to figure out a way to ensure that the parents are aware and can also contribute to the learning process. Yes, BYOD is being implemented in classrooms, but we could even go on to try and discover if there is a way that schools can going completely paperless. Would students even want that? Is this absurd? I have a desire to maximize technology in system. There is plenty more to explore in the world of BYOD in school systems.

Still Digging

Today’s research was a little different. Instead of taking a look at things through the lens of a student, I took a look from the other side of the spectrum. I looked at a broader image and even stumbled across a list of pros and cons for BYOD by both the students and the teachers. BYOD is spreading like a wildfire across the world in the both school and the workplace.Of course there are kinks that must be worked out, but a start the start is very promising. For this post, I would like to explore a few of the pros and cons to help build my case for BYOD in the schools.

First I would like to look at the cons. While analyzing this list, some of the cons were teacher resistance for the teachers like the ones who taught my father, students not being to afford the technology, opportunities for theft, opportunities for cheating, and wireless network overloads. While all of these are valid points, I feel like these issues can still be avoided. For instance, teachers have to adapt just as the students due. This would be an opportunity to grow together. Of course not all students will be able to afford the technology, but a majority of students have technology already. For those that do not, a private payment plan or financial assistance can be offered to the individuals. This way no student has to be embarrassed because they don’t have their own. Knowing that this is the route to take, the wireless network should be installed with a wide enough range to be able to carry the capacity of devices present. Colleges have universal networks that cater to thousands. Cheating can be combatted be either paper tests, or lockdown browsers that only go away once the testing is completely over. For theft, I would suggest keeping the technology on you at all times. Leaving technology around is careless, especially considering how expensive it is.

Now to look at the pros. For starters, when researching, the list could only come up with 15 cons, while there were 20 pros, so that’s a start already. the integration of technology is inevitable. With the implementation of BYOD, schools will save thousands of dollars. Instead of having to provide a device to each and every student, they bring their own which allows for other and better uses for the schools finances. Other pros were that students already know how to use the technology, all assignments will be in one place, students don’t have to stop learning when they leave school, and that BYOD engages the students and builds enthusiasm. If BYOD is used, schools will be able to bypass a standard “training” session for the technology because the students will probably be able to operate them better than the adults to begin with. Losing a piece of paper in your backpack is so easy to do. With technology, all of the assignments will be in one place for quick and easy access. Because the device belongs to the students, they will be able to continue their studies when they get home. Maybe there wasn’t enough time in the school day, so they continue their education once they get home. The students love their technology, so this is fun and engaging for them. They actually enjoy the learning process this way. BYOD in the school systems has a very bright future.

Interview

As you all know I have been doing my Genius Hour Project on BYOD in the school systems. For my interview, I struggled to decide if I wanted someone extremely knowledgeable about the subject, or if I wanted someone close to the purpose for my research. A happy medium for me would have been someone who knows a little bit about both, which is how I came to the final conclusion that the person I interview should be my father. He is close to my sister and understands her, while at the same time is not oblivious to the fact that the world is changing.

I first explained the concept of what I was doing to my father, and before I could begin the interview, he was so impressed with the Genius Hour concept that we had to spend the first 30 minutes discussing that and how he could incorporate that into his career. I then began to ask him about questions about BYOD, which was a good balance since he grew up in a age where chalk boards was the only thing that they had as educational “tools” so to speak. My father is very structured person. He would much rather things be consistent and repetitive rather than constant changing and unpredictability. That’s how he was raised and that’s all that he knows. He’s been working with the same company for 26 years, so him being consistent is sort of a understatement.

When it comes to his feelings towards BYOD and as it pertains to my sister Brooke, he admitted that it took awhile. He started off by telling me that he didn’t understand. If he could do it and find the drive, determination, and motivation necessary as a first generation college student, then why couldn’t his daughter.

He couldn’t wrap his head around the fact that this is a new generation with new methods, new definitions of fun, and new and “improved” ways of learning. He knew that Brooke was very tech savvy and that a majority of her time was spent using technology. Once he realized this, I then lead him to understanding that if this is where most of her time is spent anyways, then incorporating education into her favorite past time would be genius. She would be learning and not even feel like it’s hard work because she would be enjoying herself. While reluctant at first, by the end of the interview and now that he had a better understanding, he was a supporter of BYOD in the school systems.

Research…

Humans often fear what they don’t understand. BYOD is concept that is foreign to the school systems. For so long, everything has been pencil, paper, and an instructor. The teachers are not used to incorporating it, therefore the students have never experienced learning with their technology.We cannot live our lives in fear, for if we do there will be no progress made. For every great discovery, there had to be a leap of faith. “High risk, high reward!” has never been more relevant.

When conducting my research, I wanted to try and think a little differently. Of course schools have published articles and their successes and failures implementing BYOD, but I also wanted to hear the students’ opinion as well. I was thinking of questions for the students that I would like to ask. I began asking myself questions such as, “Do the students even want this implemented?” I began to wonder if they enjoyed their current learning circumstances, what devices they would want to have the most, and things of that nature.

I like to look at a situation form both sides. I don’t believe in effectively analyzing a situation if only one perspective is viewed. I took a look from the administrative position and that of a student. It got me to thinking about the most effective way to implement it. It also got me to thinking of ways ensure the devices for educational purposes only while at school. For instance, when taking an online test, we sometimes use lockdown browsers that ensures that the test is the only thing accessible at the time. Think about if that concept was incorporated into an app that could allow schools to monitor and facilitate the learning on personal devices in school.

If my grandmother was to ask, “Bradley, what did you learn about your question?” I would respond and tell her, “More than you could’ve ever imagined Granny.” Some of the articles that I researched include the development of inquiry skills in primary science with BYOD Inquiry Skills, whether or not the world is ready Are We Ready?, the things that work What Works?, and also the things we should consider with BYOD 5 Components.

Common Interests

While working on my Genius Hour project this week, I came to find that two of my other classmates are also looking into BYOD in classrooms. Both Ashlyn and Kalli have done great work with the topic and I’m sure that we all have great information to share, combine, and distribute so that others can be just as informed as we are. After all, knowledge is power.

Often times in a class, we never really get to know our classmates. By doing our genius hour projects, we get to learn more  about our classmates’ lives and understand what fuels their flame. For instance, some student have family members that have disorders, so they seek to help their loved ones. In my case, my sister is really interested in technology, so if I can find a way to incorporate that into her learning, I know she will excel. I’ve come to find that my classmates and I share things that allow us to work towards a common goal.

While on Twitter, I began searching multiple hashtags and topics on Twitter that provide different information on BYOD. I searched things such as #BYOD, #BYODed, BYOD in the classrooms, and things of that nature. By doing so, I was able to connect with different schools and programs that test BYOD in their classrooms. The successes and failures, learning what works and what doesn’t has been very beneficial.

I also came to find out that the classroom may be way behind on the BYOD wave. While scavenging Twitter for hashtags and information, I noticed that businesses and corporations have been using the BYOD method. In fact, on one article I read where it said this is the future. BYOD has been successful for them and they plan to continue on with advancements with BYOD in the workplace. Tech In Schools is also another good article that I came across on Twitter. If the work place is implementing it, and our students’ end goal is to make it to or create a workplace, why should we hinder their growth in the schools?

 

The Beginning

The topic that I will be exploring is how Bring Your Own Device can be efficiently implemented into the K12 environment without taking away from the educational setting. This topic is very close to me because my little sister is very into technology and she enjoys using her technology. Most of the times her grades don’t reflect her true intelligence. She isn’t the best test taker, but at home I’ve seen her do things at the age of 12 with technology that most adults can’t do. I’m certain that if she’s allowed to implement her technology into her learning, she will take more interest in school because she will be having fun while she learns. Most traditional teachers are anti technology, but the newer generation of students has evolved and education must grow with them in order to ensure meaningful Learning.

In the K12 environment, BYOD is still an idea that isn’t accepted worldwide yet. There are a few pilot schools that have taken the initiative to test this out and have been pleased with the results for the most part. For instance, we had to evolve in education from chalk boards, to dry erase boards, to overhead projectors, and now we’ve made it all the way to smart boards and screen sharing. I don’t believe in stagnant education. As the human race evolves, so must everything else that helps us evolve. BYOD allows for students to use technology they they are comfortable operating and can allow for less instruction on “how to” and more time actually teaching the material.

 

To begin my research, I will research the advantages and disadvantages of BYOD along with some schools that have already begun using BYOD. I plan to analyze their methods, way for improvement, and also where they excel. Im curious as to where the implementation thrives the most. Some of the schools from the Horizon Report such as the Baraboo School District and the Clark County School District will be where I begin my research. Some important hashtags to search on twitter are #BYOD #iPaded #EdApps and #k12. Also follow @BYODnews for the latest updates. I want to help improve BYOD in education so that I can see my sister excel.